Insights from Mojo Master and CEO of HireMojo, John Younger

Insights from Mojo Master and CEO of HireMojo, John Younger

I’m looking forward to the keynote on August 25th at the HR TechXpo in San Francisco by John Younger. He is the CEO and Mojo Master of Hiremojo, a San Francisco based hiring software company that develops and deploys RecruiterBots® and helps companies save time by automating most administrative recruiting related tasks and eliminating the need to have multiple vendor contracts.

With over 30,000 jobs filled and increasing daily, HireMojo’s big data and AI are making predictive hiring a reality. HireMojo performs the routine tasks related to finding, vetting and building relationships that promote a company’s brand, along with automatically incorporating most other relevant recruiting sites and software, the year-round task of filling jobs for hiring managers and HR shifts from repetitive work to conducting final interviews and making hiring decisions.

Many HR professionals are still not sure what a robot means in the context of their industry, and they are concerned that their jobs may be at risk. I met up with John recently to get clarity about robots in general, as well as get more information about the impact they might have on people currently working in the staffing and recruiting roles.

 

Q: Ok, we have all seen Terminator and the idea of a robot is a little scary.  What is a robot in the context of today’s world?

A: The entertainment industry’s idea of a robot is to sell movie tickets and is quite a bit different than the reality of robots all around us today.  It might help to first know the actual definition of a robot: “a machine capable of carrying out a complex series of actions automatically, especially one programmable by a computer.”  Most people are aware that there are robots all around us in our everyday lives already.  For example, robots do most of the work of building Tesla’s cars, managing warehouse logistics for Amazon and producing computer chips for Intel.  These are industrial robots.

Software robots, by contrast, represent something more disruptive.  Living on servers in the cloud, they are the ethereal cousins to their mechanical counterparts.  In many ways, they mimic humans in that they are trained, not programmed, and interact with multiple incapable core systems just like people.  But unlike humans, they see patterns invisible to humans and can make the optimal use of resources repeatedly, with high consistency and in a way that evolves based on actual results.

 

Q: Ok, we have all seen Terminator and the idea of a robot is a little scary.  What is a robot in the context of today’s world?

A: The entertainment industry’s idea of a robot is to sell movie tickets and is quite a bit different than the reality of robots all around us today.  It might help to first know the actual definition of a robot: “a machine capable of carrying out a complex series of actions automatically, especially one programmable by a computer.”  Most people are aware that there are robots all around us in our everyday lives already.  For example, robots do most of the work of building Tesla’s cars, managing warehouse logistics for Amazon and producing computer chips for Intel.  These are industrial robots.

Software robots, by contrast, represent something more disruptive.  Living on servers in the cloud, they are the ethereal cousins to their mechanical counterparts.  In many ways, they mimic humans in that they are trained, not programmed, and interact with multiple incapable core systems just like people.  But unlike humans, they see patterns invisible to humans and can make the optimal use of resources repeatedly, with high consistency and in a way that evolves based on actual results.

 

Q: Recruiting and hiring is often described as a “human” function, so where do robots fit in?

A: Recruiting and hiring is all about connecting with the right people for each job and building relationships that result in successful hires.  Ironically, a RecruiterBot® can dramatically improve a team’s ability to create and build relationships.  Most people struggle to do this well, which is why there are over 5.3M open jobs today with over 40% of which have remained open for 3 months or longer.  How many HR people have you met who have been able to easily and consistently fill most jobs within 2 to 3 weeks across all functions, throughout the year?   Most cannot.  When we looked at what it takes to build relationships to accomplish this goal, three things jumped out.

The first is that it’s impossible to build a recruiting-related relationship with someone you never meet.  Unlike humans who only have so much time throughout the day to reach out to people and may not have the budget or knowledge of where to find the right person today (which may be different than yesterday), a RecruiterBot® uses big data to direct source as if it were a small army of people, promoting jobs across appropriate communities 7×24.  The net result is that many more of the right people will know about the job within a fraction of the time and with less cost.

The second is that once you meet someone if you don’t have an appropriate, accurate and compelling “conversation starter” and interaction, the relationship will likely go nowhere.  We found that many humans reaching out to people about jobs do so in small numbers, inconsistently, using more generic job profiles and often don’t know what separates a good candidate from a great candidate.  By contrast, a RecruiterBot® can share information in stages and determine fit for each person within a few minutes with surgical precision.

The third is that consistent and respectful communication, regardless of the hiring outcome, builds stronger relationships and promotes the company’s brand.  While all HR people aspire to get back with all applicants multiple times throughout the process, it’s simply too costly to have the call center needed to do this with humans.  By contrast, a RecruiterBot® can easily keep all stakeholders updated appropriately throughout the entire process and at each step.  One interesting benefit is that employee referrals tend to go up quite a bit when the employees are frequently kept in the loop as their referrals progress through the interview and selection process.

 

Q: What can attendees of the NCRHA HR TechXpo expect to learn from your presentation?

A:  SkyNet is real.  The Terminators (I and II are the only ones we should be afraid of) are coming.  Not really – but there are dramatic and fundamental changes on the horizon for how recruiting will be complimented with nimble, dynamic and versatile robots.  I think it’s interesting how we are already seeing businesses and HR departments evolving to use analytics to drive their processes.  Attendees will not only learn about some of the exciting recruiting-related robots coming online today, but also how HR staff supporting this function can capitalize on these robots rather than being replaced by them.

####

You can find Mojo Master John Younger on: LinkedIn.
You can also meet up with John at the HR TechXpo in San Francisco on August 25th. He will present his session entitled, Into the looking glass — HR technology that can predict your future at 11:15a.m.


Be sure to follow @HireMojo (Twitter), Facebook, Linkedin, Instagram, and YouTube.

If you’d like to comment or have further questions for John Younger (or me), I welcome you to post here (below), on Twitter @GregJMorton or on LinkedIn (adding #CEOCorner).

Greg Morton  is a corporate strategy and growth development specialist and Chief Executive Officer of the Northern California HR Association.


Share HR West 2017 Info! > HR in the most innovative place on earth! #HRWest17
Posted in CEO Corner and tagged , , , .